These are the Things Your Doctor May Not Tell You About Menopause

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Menopause is a significant experience for women. The body goes through major changes, including no longer having a menstrual cycle. While there are symptoms that are well-known as being part of this change, there are also things that occur that may be part of menopause that you don’t expect. Your doctor should be a valuable source of information and support. However, there are things your doctor may not tell you that you need to know so you can stay healthy.

What are the things your doctor may not tell you about menopause?

“You may find that you are much more fatigued than before, even with the same amount of sleep. These are normal changes that occur at this time of your life, but that your doctor might not tell you about when you start getting more common symptoms.”

While there are lots of well-known symptoms, like emotional changes and hot flashes, there are things that happen during this change in your body that your doctor may not tell you. Knowing that these things can happen can help you deal with your menstrual cycle ending more effectively, so what do you need to know that your doctor didn’t tell you?

This change affects more than just your reproductive system

These are the Things Your Doctor May Not Tell You About Menopause

Even though this change is based in the reproductive system, it has widespread effects on your body. The hormones that change can result in changes in lots of other body systems. For example, you may find that your bladder is different, including experiencing incontinence and urinary urgency.

You may find that you are much more fatigued than before, even with the same amount of sleep. These are normal changes that occur at this time of your life, but that your doctor might not tell you about when you start getting more common symptoms.

Your moods aren’t the only thing that change

These are the Things Your Doctor May Not Tell You About Menopause

Along with well-known mood changes like irritability, anxiety, and depression, your body is going through a lot of other changes, as well. Your hormones regulate lots of body systems, so when your hormones change, you can experience other physical changes.

For example, you may find that your cholesterol levels are affected, even if you aren’t eating any differently. You may also find that you hold weight differently. Knowing that these changes are attributed to this change can help you deal with them more effectively.

You might still have cycles for a while

Even though this change means your period stops, your body has to adjust to the change. That means that you may have menstrual cycles randomly until your body is completely adjusted. These cycles can occur without warning and without keeping to a schedule.

Why is your doctor not telling you these things?

“your doctor may not tell you about some of these symptoms is because you have other conditions or risk factors that would cause them.”

Sometimes your doctor may not tell you these things because not everyone experiences them. This change affects each person differently, so not everyone has the same symptoms. If a particular symptom doesn’t occur very often, your doctor may not think to tell you about it.

Another reason your doctor may not tell you about some of these symptoms is because you have other conditions or risk factors that would cause them. For example, if you have a history of high cholesterol, your doctor may not attribute cholesterol changes to what’s happening to your reproductive system. Instead, your doctor will think it’s part of your ongoing problems.

How to talk to your doctor about the things you want to know

You are your biggest and best advocate for your health care. If you have concerns about your health, it’s important to speak up and ask questions and discuss them with your doctor. Here are some ways you can make sure that your concerns are addressed when you speak with your doctor.

“Whether you’re experiencing symptoms that are concerning you or you just want to know more about what to expect, it’s important to have open communication with your doctor.”

  • Make a list of written concerns to take with you to your next appointment.
  • Make an appointment specifically to talk about your concerns.
  • When your doctor asks if you have any questions, speak up and ask your questions.
  • If your doctor downplays your concerns, ask why they are unconcerned about it so you can understand better.
These are the Things Your Doctor May Not Tell You About Menopause

Whether you’re experiencing symptoms that are concerning you or you just want to know more about what to expect, it’s important to have open communication with your doctor. There are things your doctor may not tell you about menopause, so you need to be an advocate for your own health.

Take the time to speak with your doctor about your experiences and ask questions about what’s happening with your body. The more you know about what’s happening, and how it affects you, the easier it will be to stay healthy during this time of transition.

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Sources & References:

https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/what-are-signs-and-symptoms-menopause

https://www.womenshealth.northwestern.edu/blog/cholesterol-and-menopause

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