Top 4 Risky Menopause Symptoms: When to See a Doctor?

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Top 4 Risky Menopause Symptoms When to See a Doctor

Menopause. For some women, it’s a relief when it finally arrives. No more worrying about unexpected pregnancy and premenstrual mood swings. Although this is the case for many, there are some women who are less than thrilled.

For some women, entering this stage of life means the onset of more than hot flashes. With menopause comes an increase in certain health risks including increased LDL cholesterol, which can possibility increase the risk of heart disease. In addition, insomnia and sexual dysfunction can plague some women for 15 years or more. These unpleasant side effects to an otherwise normal rite of passage can make life almost unbearable.

Regardless of your attitude towards it, the onset usually comes and goes and without causing great harm, excluding a few extra pounds and possibly a little less hair. However, not every woman walks away unscathed when they enter menopause. Some may suffer from prolonged period while others develop severe depression for the first time in their lives.

Heavy Bleeding

No two women will suffer the same menopausal symptoms. While some will experience complete cessation of their menstrual abruptly, others will develop ongoing heavy bleeding that warrants attention.

When to See Your Doctor

“Although it’s not uncommon to have irregularity in your menses, ongoing heavy bleeding needs to be followed closely”

Approximately 25 of all women experience heavy bleeding (also known as menorrhagia) during the perimenopause stage. Heavy bleeding puts you at risk of becoming anemic from blood volume loss. If this is the case, you feel faint when going from sitting to standing. In addition, this means your blood volume is also decreased.

Although it’s not uncommon to have irregularity in your menses, ongoing heavy bleeding needs to be followed closely. If you develop heavy bleeding that soaks through a pad every hour or so, you need to touch base with doctor immediately.

Depression

The transitional period can be overwhelming for some women. Rapidly fluctuating hormone levels have a tremendous impact on the neurotransmitters in the brain.

Drops in estrogen during can lead to anxiety, depression and mood swings. Again, it is normal to feel a bit moody and maybe even a little blue, but ongoing sadness needs to addressed.

Depression that occurs during perimenopause is not treated any differently when compared to depression that strikes at another time. Menopause symptoms of depression can include:

  • Loss of energy
  • Sadness
  • Feelings of hopelessness
  • Uncontrollable crying
  • Irritability

The above list is not inclusive to all possible depressive symptoms.

When to See Your Doctor

If you’re experiencing depressive symptoms for longer than a week or two, you need to follow up with your physician. Mild depression can be treated with hormone replacement therapy, lifestyle changes and counseling. In cases of severe depression, hormone replacement will not improve symptoms.In this case, treatment may include antidepressant drug therapy and psychotherapy.

“While usually harmless, palpitations of any kind, including as part of menopause symptoms, should not be ignored”

Ongoing Heart Palpitations

Heart palpitations, also known as an arrhythmia or irregular heartbeats. If you have palpitations, you may feel your heart flutter, pound or beat irregularly. Usually short-lived, most palpitations abate uneventfully.

When to See Your Doctor

While usually harmless, palpitations of any kind, including as part of menopause symptoms, should not be ignored. Your doctor will want to know if you shortness of breath, dizziness, nausea or vomiting with the palpitations. If deemed stable from a medical point of view, simple lifestyle changes like decreasing caffeine intake, avoiding stress and avoiding stimulant can reduce the symptoms.

High Blood Pressure

High blood pressure, also known as a silent killer, can creep up on menopausal women, even those who have never had elevated pressures before. And while it’s perfectly normal to have mild fluctuations in your blood pressure, it’s important to report a sudden onset of red-flag symptoms. These symptoms typically include:

  • Headaches
  • Dizziness
  • Blurred vision
  • Shortness of breath

When to See Your Doctor

“If you feel like you’ve been blindsided by menopause symptoms, just remember that they are temporary and will eventually pass”

If you find yourself with any of the above-mentioned symptoms, especially if you do not have a previously diagnosed condition, you need to see your family physician immediately. He or she will ask you to keep a record of your blood pressures and to report back if it is continually elevated. In turn, even mild hypertension can be effectively treated with medication if it does not respond to lifestyle changes.

If you feel like you’ve been blindsided by menopause symptoms, just remember that they are temporary and will eventually pass. Know that when one door closes, another opens and this is just a new beginning to the next chapter of your life.

Sources and References:

https://www.verywellhealth.com/serious-menopause-symptoms-2322805

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